Fly Life Magazine

Industry Shouts & Murmurs Mar. 1 – 8

In his RIO  video, Gawesworth explains and demonstrates the basics of Spey casting with a single handed rod. This film doesn’t delve into any particular Spey cast, rather it shows the concept of how to make a Spey cast with a single-handed rod.

How To Make A Single Handed Spey Cast

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho

Built on RIO’s ultra-low stretch ConnectCore, the InTouch Single Handed Spey 3D has a thick handling section for great control and a rear weight distribution that loads the rod deeply for easy roll and Spey casts in tight quarters. Available in WF3F/H/I through WF8F/HI, this line won IFTD’s Best Freshwater Line award in 2017, so pick one up at your nearest RIO dealer for $99.99.

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The R.L. Winston Rod Company and Bauer Fly Reels are delighted to announce that Scott Forristall has joined the company as President and CEO

COLORADO – Angling Trade

Scott has been involved in the fishing and outdoor market for the past 25 years. He started as GM for Tycoon Fin-Nor and moved to Eagle Claw Fishing Tackle, then on to Johnson Outdoors where he was the Director of the Watercraft Business Unit. His most recent position was VP of Sales for Far Bank Enterprises. Scott brings years of successful business experience to direct the future of Winston and Bauer.

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Steaming Fly Tying Materials

ANCORAGE, Alaska

Tea pot steaming fly tying materials: A few weeks ago we shared with you a clever hack for rejuvenating those beat-up flies at the bottom of your boat bag or wader pocket using a quick steam treatment.

Admittedly, we forgot to include the tip that gave us the idea in the first place. The same process works wonders on tying materials too!

Anywhere from a few seconds to a minute (depending on material) of steam can return bent or crushed hackle feathers back to their original shape, straighten deformed hanks of deer hair, and make easier work of most other stubborn feathers and herls.

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Women’s History Month 2018: Talking With Elizabeth Marchetti

Elizabeth Marchetti, photo NOAA.

SILVER SPRING, Maryland

March is Women’s History Month. We’ve asked five of our women scientists to share a little about their science journey, what hurdles or obstacles they’ve experienced during their journey, how they overcame them, and what advice they might have for the next generation of women scientists. Candid, honest and full of sage advice, find out more each week in March as we feature their incredible stories.

Elizabeth Marchetti is a field scientist located at our Narragansett Laboratory in Rhode Island and works for the Cooperative Research Branch. She collects fisheries data aboard commercial fishing vessels and assist commercial fishermen with their electronic reporting.

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Check Out “The School of Trout”

COLORADO, Angling Trade

Tom Rosenbauer – Orvis.

The Angling Trade editors are honored and pleased to have been invited to take part in a new endeavor called the “School of Trout.” Guide, author, and Conservation Hawks lead man Todd Tanner is the School of Trout’s creator and headmaster.

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Spring Aboard: Take A Boating Safety Course

WINTER PARK, Florida

Even the most casual boater often believes that he or she knows everything necessary to have a great day out boating. However, if you’ve spent any significant amount of time on the water, it’s obvious that too many boaters are confused or unaware of some basic rules about navigation, alcohol use and safety equipment. To help improve boating knowledge, and thereby boater safety, the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, the U.S. Coast Guard, and a group of public and private boating safety entities are promoting the Spring Aboard – Take a Boating Education Course campaign.

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Seismic Testing’s Deafening Noise Threatens Marine Mammals

OAKLAND, California

To most people, the ocean environment seems like one of serene silence. In reality, it’s a smorgasbord of sound. And not all of the noise is helpful to the marine life inhabiting it. In January, the Trump administration proposed opening up more than 90 percent of U.S. coastline to offshore oil and gas drilling. Seismic testing surveys would accompany that plan, threatening to make the ocean a much noisier and more dangerous place for marine mammals and other sea life. Seismic testing generally involves an array of air guns pulled on the back of a large boat. The guns release bursts of highly pressurized air into the water, sending soundwaves to the ocean floor and back in order to detect reservoirs of oil and gas. The blasts are loud—according to the Center for Biological Diversity, they can reach up to 250 decibels, and the noise reverberates for miles.

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One Year In, Ryan Zinke’s Conservation Legacy Would Make His Hero Scowl

WASHINGTON, DC

President Teddy Roosevelt.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke ― the pro-gun, cowboy hat-wearing, can’t-rig-a-fly-rod Montanan who outfitted his office with a slew of dead creatures he didn’t shoot and insists a special flag be raised above the agency’s headquarters each time he walks through the door ― speaks often of his love for America’s conservationist president, Theodore Roosevelt.

Zinke’s turbulent tenure as chief steward of America’s natural resources has proven him to be a controversial figure and widely considered among the most anti-environment Cabinet appointees in American history.

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